Clausewitz Full Alpha Ruleset

The following is a full list of the Alpha rules. Please take your time to read through them or download the Word Document attached. I’m looking for feedback on everything from spelling, wording and location of paragraphs to feedback on rules etc. No opinion is a bad opinion and please be as thorough as you can! All people who provide feedback will be mentioned in the rulebook upon its release as a thank you. The word document attached has track changes on so please feel free to make as many changes as you like and send the document to clausewitz.tabletop@gmail.com

The rules below have been adjusted and all articles on the nations will be revisited to update the rules for the individual units.

Again, thank you to everyone who has helped me get this far with the rules but especially to Chris Pringle and Lehann who gave many a thoughtful idea or suggestion on the way!

————————————————————————————————————————

THE SCALE
Clausewitz has been designed for 6mm wargaming at a scale of 1:5300, which roughly equates to one 6mm figure representing 50 men. One foot equates to one mile.

There is nothing to stop players using other scales however, please see the section on ‘Other Miniature Scales’.

THE FIGURES AND BASING
Basing for the scale mentioned above is 40mm wide and 30mm deep, these apply to all types of units apart from Aide-de-camp (ADC’s) which can be represented on any small round base as a single mounted miniature.

Unit bases have two dice holders on each base at the back which represent the formation that Unit is in and the number of combat dice the Unit possess. Alternatively, these can be tracked using pen and paper.

Command bases are the same size as Unit bases with dice holders to represent the Brigades Actions, Morale and Strength.

ADC’s are a single miniature on a round base with a single dice holder representing an objective target (more on this later).

Each base represents a unit, this may be a Battalion (Infantry), Squadron (Cavalry) or Company (Artillery). These bases are grouped together into Brigades which are the main elements of any game. Bases inside a Brigade act together simultaneously.

THE BATTLEFIELD
A game of Clausewitz can be played on any size playing area but 6’x4′ is ideal for representing the larger battles of the time.

TERRAIN
There are various types of terrain that affect gameplay and are fall under different categories:

Open
This represents your standard rolling countryside and fields. Open has no effect on the outcome of the battle. Quick March can only be used on open terrain.

Units moving along roads can take advantage of a +1cm addition to their movement speed.

Rough
Rough ground can be anything from scrubland to ploughed fields. Units passing through rough terrain are unable to use Quick March.

Difficult
Units moving through difficult terrain halve their movement speed (rounded up) as they make certain of their footing.

Impassable
Only units with the special rule El Bruc may move through, down or up impassable terrain at a rate of 1cm per action. If this unit is inside a Brigade with other units that do not possess this special rule then the Brigade cannot take advantage of this rule.

Impassable terrain may be such areas like ravines or cliffs.

A section on terrain types is included towards the back of the rules with the different effects each terrain type has on play and their classification. For example, troops inside of woods receive a 6+ saving throw. Troops uphill in a melee to their enemy will receive a +1 to their combat dice roll.

BRIGADES
A Brigade is made up of a number of bases known as “Units” which represent Battalions, Cavalry or Artillery companies, or even a combination of all three in some instances. Each Unit will add its own attributes to that of the Brigade. As well as the Units mentioned above, there will also be a Brigadier General base (same base dimensions) who represents the Brigade command.

Each Brigade is made up of basic attributes which are enhanced by the units that are included within that Brigade. Brigades can be no larger than five troop bases and one command base. These attributes are:

Command: 8+
Before any actions are carried out by a Brigade, they must pass a command test. This must be a D6 roll higher than that specified on their Brigade card. This roll can be modified by nearby Generals who can add some of their command bonus to the roll to help the unit pass. If that unit fails its roll it cannot act that turn.

Morale 8+
Morale is used once the unit is within the Zone of Control of any enemy units. This will be modified by formations of units within the Brigade and also by the number of units inside the Brigade. Each Unit stand (not command stand) will add +1 to this roll. A Brigade cannot increase this beyond 3+ and a roll of 2 in 2D6 is always a failure.

Strength: 0
Strength is an optional attribute which the player can use to determine how many loss’s their army or Brigades suffered at the end of the battle. For every 50 men added to the Brigade increase this attribute by 1.

Steady 5+
This is the roll needed for the men in the Brigade to reload their weapons effectively under the gaze of the enemy and pluck up their courage to shoot at the men opposite them. Rolls which are successful can be rolled again in the ‘Fire!’ step of shooting. A ‘Fire!’ roll sees whether the Brigade hits its target, needing 4+ at effective range and 5+ at long range. Some elite units may boost this roll to a 4+ or perhaps grant re-rolls to a portion of the dice.

Combat Dice: 0
This is the number of dice the Brigade can use when it’s firing its weapons at the enemy or taking part in a melee action. As units are added to the Brigade the number of Combat Dice will increase in proportion with the size of the unit that is being added. A dice is added for every 200 men of a unit. When a Brigade takes any damage, for each damage roll a die on 5+ their Combat Dice pool is reduced by 1.

Skirmish Dice: 0
The number of skirmish dice assigned to the Brigade is determined by the number of light infantry units inside the Brigade and the number of other units with the Skirmishers special rule. For each 1000 men (rounded up) of a light infantry or unit with the Skirmishers special Rule, add 1 skirmish die. Skirmish dice are explained in greater detail later on in these rules.

Artillery Dice: 0
Each time Artillery units are assigned to the Brigade the Artillery dice pool is increased by one for each artillery piece that is added.

CC v Foot: 5+
This is the basic melee stat for all Brigades. When a Brigade meets an opposing foot unit in base-to-base contact on terrain that isn’t open, those Brigades will fight a melee action. Using their combat dice, rolls of equal or higher the value specified will result in a hit against the opposing Brigade.

CC v Mounted: 6+
This is the basic melee stat for all Brigades. When a Brigade meets an opposing mounted unit in base-to-base contact on terrain that isn’t open, those Brigades will fight a melee action. Using their combat dice, rolls of equal or higher the value specified will result in a hit against the opposing Brigade.

UNIT FORMATIONS
Foot units inside a Brigade can take on different formations depending on the situation they find themselves in. To change the formation for any units within the Brigade, the Brigade must use an action to change unit formations for one action point. The formations available to foot troops are:

Line Formation
The line formation allows the unit to fire all available combat dice assigned to it. Fire from artillery is less effective from the front and only causes half damage (half the damage from all incoming artillery fire and round up). Artillery fire directly into the flank of a line unit would cause double damage. (double all damage from incoming artillery fire). Units in line formation cannot use its quick march speed.

Column Formation
Any units that are in column formation grant the Brigade an additional one to its morale (remember that the Brigade morale cannot exceed 3+). Units in column formation can use the quick march pace. Columns are vulnerable to Artillery fire and so receive double damage from all incoming artillery attacks. Cavalry pose less of threat to units in column formation and therefore cannot charge them, the Cavalry special rule is reduced by one for Brigades that have their units in Columns (i.e., Cavalry (-2) is reduced to Cavalry (-1) and Cavalry (-1) is negated).

Square Formation
Used solely as a defensive formation any units in Square cannot move, and suffer double damage from artillery attacks. Cavalry cannot charge units in Square formation and their Cavalry special rule does not affect units in Square.

PLAY METHODS
Clausewitz can be used to either re-fight historical engagements where players can build an army using the order of battle at the time, or, as a points-based game where players build armies of equal value.

THE TURN

There are 30 turns to a game of Clausewitz, this represents 5 hours of battle. Players may wish to add more turns if they’re refiguring a historic engagement.

Each turn represents 10 minutes real time of battle, for example Turn 1 may represent the battle time between 9:50am and 10am.

OBJECTIVES
Each game will have a number of objectives on the battlefield which players will score points for holding. Objectives are numbered, and Brigades are given orders to hold these objectives. Brigades can only score victory points for their player if the Brigade has been designated to hold that objective by an ADC. At the end of each turn points are counted up and added to a running total.

GENERALS
Each player will be represented by a single base on the tabletop representing them as Commander-in-Chief (CinC). Players can move their commanders around the field of battle to issue orders to their Generals of Division (GD) or to their Brigadier Generals (BG) if playing in a smaller game.

The CinC can issue ADC’s to send orders to a General of Division or Brigade, when they do so an ADC base leaves the CinC with a dice representing the number of the objective that the Brigade can attack. A CinC can only issue one ADC per turn.

An ADC must first make base to base contact with the General of Division for that Brigade however (chain of command and all that). Once they have made contact the ADC can continue o. To the Brigade.

Generals of Division and the Commander-in-Chief all have 5 command points they can spend each turn if they’re withing a certain distance if any friendly Units. Command points can be used to buff a Brigades command stat to make it easier for them to enact orders that turn.

If Generals are in base-to-base contact with a friendly unit in melee with the enemy the General can also take part and adds one additional combat dice to the friendly Brigade in combat. This dice is the equivalent of the Generals personal guard, as elite fighters these will hit on 4’s in melee.

SCOUTING PHASE
Before deploying their unit’s players will enter a mini-game to determine their deployment areas. Each general will have a number of Deployment Markers which represent the number of Light Infantry or Light Cavalry in their army.

These Markers move at a rate of 15cm. The generals move these Markers across the table in alternate turns. Each marker must be within either 15cm of a board edge or another friendly marker. If at any point a marker moves to within 15cm of any of the opponent’s markers both their marker and their opponents are locked into position and cannot move any further. Once all markers are ‘locked’ the area those markers enclose represent the players deployment area. Players then place their units in the table alternately beginning with the player who locked all their markers first.

PLAYING THE GAME
There are no phases in Clausewitz, instead at the beginning of a game each player has a single-coloured die or chip which they place inside a bag. Shake the bag and draw, whoever’s die or chip is drawn may act with their CinC first. The CinC may either move 30cm OR issue an ADC to a Brigade.

Once the ADC reaches a General of Division or Brigade and has given them their objective that General or Brigade is considered to be ‘activated’.

Once a Brigade or General has been activated an additional chip or die for that player can be added to the draw bag for the next turn. When that player draws their chip the next turn, they can then choose which of their activated elements to use.

ACTIVATED ELEMENTS
Each element can use up to five actions per turn, some actions cost more than others a list of actions is shown later on.

Actions usually revolve around moving, changing formation or attacking the enemy.

REACTIONS
Elements may choose to reserve some of their actions as reactions. Reactions enable you to respond to enemies within 10cm of your elements, this distance is known as the ‘Zone of Control’. Therefore, if you have activated a unit and are perhaps 15-20cm away from the enemy it may be wise to reserve some of your actions as reactions so that you can repulse the enemy of they attack.

If you’re outside of the zone of control of an enemy and you’re moving a unit that will end all its actions without entering an enemies Zone of Control you can choose to use all your actions at once to speed up play. For example, moving your infantry 10cm instead of 2cm per action.

ZONE OF CONTROL
Once opposing elements close to within 10cm they have entered the zone of control. From this point forward these elements can only move directly towards or directly away from the enemy in their ZoC.

Actions within a ZoC must be taken one at a time and must be preceded by a morale check for the unit performing the action. If they fail their morale check then depending on how badly that unit has failed by will determine how the unit reacts.

If the element passes its morale check it may use an action as normal and the enemy must then make a morale test to perform a defensive reaction. If either element fails their morale test by a value of 2 or less, that element will withdraw directly away from the enemy at its standard move rate (while keeping its front towards the enemy), this is known as a withdrawal, it may not make any more actions that turn aside from defensive fire or withdrawals as reactions. If an element fails by a value of more than 2 then that element flees using the move distance it has available from its remaining actions (i.e., the element has four actions remaining, it will make four move actions ending with the element facing away from the enemy and the element may not use perform any other actions or reactions that turn and must pass a morale test the next turn to move as normal. If it fails this test then it will flee a further 5 actions.

ACTIONS & REACTIONS

Order (Cost: 1 Action Point)
A general can issue an order once per turn to a subcommander (this may be a General of Division in the case of the Commander-in-Chief or a Brigade in the case of the General of Division). When doing so, an ADC is placed in base-to-base contact with the command stand issuing the order, it may then move 30cm towards its intended target regardless of terrain.

March (Cost: 1 Action Point) Offensive/Defensive
The entire Brigade may make a move at the speed of its slowest Unit on the March. The defensive version moves the Brigade away from the enemy. Units cannot use Reactions to advance.

Quick March (Cost: 1 Action Point)
The entire Brigade may make a move at the slowest of its Unit on the Quick March. This cannot be used inside the Zone of Control of an enemy unit.

Change Unit Formations (Cost: 1 Action Point)
Any Units within the Brigade can change their formation is they are able to do so. Formations can either be Line, Square, Column or Skirmish.

Change Brigade Formation (Cost: 3 Action Points)
The entire Brigade can change its formation to having either 4, 3, 2 or 1 wide in units. Cannot be performed in a Zone of Control of the enemy.

Fire Skirmish Weapons (Cost: 1 Action Point)
A unit that has skirmish dice under its attributes can fire these at the enemy if it wishes. If it does so, the weapons can fire at long range as though they were inside effective range (hitting on 4+ instead of 6+ on their Fire! roll). This represents the skirmishers moving ahead of the main body of troops and firing on the enemy as they approach. The process for firing skirmish dice is the same as firing the weapons of the rest of the Brigade.

Fire! (Cost: 1 Action Point) offensive/defensive
The Brigade can fire all its available combat dice assigned to the front rank of units in the Brigade.

Bombard (Cost: 1 Action Point) offensive/defensive
The Brigade can fire all its available artillery dice assigned to the Brigade. If an enemy is within the Brigades Zone of Control that enemy must be the target.

Hold! (Cost: 0 Action Points) offensive/defensive
The Brigade holds position waiting for the enemy to move closer. If the enemy brigade is within weapon range the Brigade must pass a command test, if it fails to do so the Brigade will fire all its weapons at the closest enemy within range.

MOVEMENT
When using a march action foot troops can move 2cm per action, if using a quick march action, they can move 3cm.

Mounted troops move at a rate of 4cm on the march per action and 8cm at quick march.

ADVANCED RULES

Capturing Generals
Players whose Brigades move over or finish their move on top of an enemy general are considered to have captured that General. He must stay in base-to-base contact with that Brigade until a friendly Brigade defeats them in combat or the end of the game. An extra victory point is awarded per General captured or killed.

Capturing Enemy Colours
A Brigade can capture the colours of enemy units it defeats in melee on a roll of a 6. An extra victory point is awarded per colour captured.

Using Strength
If players wish and they agree between themselves, they can use the strength stat on the Brigades, this will need tracking throughout the game.  At the end of the game subtract your ending strength of all your units against what you began with. The difference between these two figures is the number of loss’s your army has suffered. Multiply the value by 50 to give you a rough estimate of how many men were killed or wounded during the engagement. This works best for replicating historical battles and comparing your results to that of the General who commanded the army at the time.

FIRING
Any type of firing is broken down into two steps.

1st Step: Steady!
Each Brigade is given a ‘Steady’ stat, this represents how nervous the men are in battle and how likely they’re to load and fire their weapons correctly. This is usually a roll of 5+.

2nd Step: Fire!
Successful ‘Steady!’ rolls then go on to make their ‘Fire!’ roll which at the effective range of the weapon is 4+ while long range is 6+. Any success from this count as hits on the enemy, if the enemy is allowed to make saving throws, they would do so once hits have been allocated to their Brigades.

TERRAIN TYPES

Woods Difficult Terrain, units inside woods receive a saving throw of 5+ from any type of weapons fire.

Ploughed FieldsRough Terrain

Villages/TownsDifficult Terrain, units inside villages or towns are considered to be imbedded inside the buildings etc and therefore receive a saving throw of 4+. Other units can attack units embedded in Villages or Towns in melee but the defender receives +1 to their combat dice.

CliffsImpassable Terrain

RavinesImpassable Terrain

LakesImpassable Terrain

RiversDifficult Terrain

Gentle HillsOpen Terrain, however units in melee in a lower position on the hill than their target suffer -1 to their combat dice rolls.

Steep HillsRough Terrain, units in melee in a lower position on the hill than their target suffer -2 to their combat dice rolls (rolls of 6 will always hit).

MarshDifficult Terrain

WEAPONS (these will be superseded by the Nations Army Lists once fully written)

Pistols
Effective Range: 1cm
Long Range: 2cm

Muskets
Effective Range: 2cm
Long Range: 4cm

Rifles
Effective Range: 4cm
Long Range: 8cm

6 Pounder Cannon
Effective Range: 10cm
Long Range: 15cm

12 Pounder Cannon
Effective Range: 12cm
Long Range: 20cm

Howitzers
Effective Range: 15cm
Long Range: 25cm

BASIC UNITS ARMY LIST (these will be superseded by the Nations Army Lists once fully written)

LINE INFANTRY           
Command: No effect
Type: Foot
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 200 men added
Skirmish Dice: +1 per 1000 men added
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules: None

LIGHT INFANTRY
Command: No effect
Type: Foot
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 200 men added
Skirmish Dice: +1 per 1000 men added
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Deployment Marker’ – adds a deployment marker for the player to use in the scouting phase of the game.

HEAVY CAVALRY
Command: No effect
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 50 men added
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Cavalry (-2)’ – All enemy foot units within 10cm suffer a -2 modifier on their morale test rolls.

LINE CAVALRY
Command: No effect
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 50 men added
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Cavalry (-1)’ – All enemy foot units within 10cm suffer a -1 modifier on their morale test rolls.

LIGHT CAVALRY
Command: +1 per unit added
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 50 men added
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Cavalry (-1)’ – All enemy foot units within 10cm suffer a -1 modifier on their morale test rolls.
‘Deployment Marker’ – adds a deployment marker for the player to use in the scouting phase of the game.

FOOT ARTILLERY
Command: No effect
Type: Foot
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: No effect
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: +1 per weapon
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Artillery’ – In Melee this unit halves the number of combat dice it may use.

HORSE ARTILLERY
Command: No effect
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: No effect
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: +1 per weapon
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Artillery’ – In Melee this unit halves the number of combat dice it may use.

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

Advertisements

Points Part I

So I’ve been thinking of the formula to concoct (this is the most suitable word) the points value of units in Clausewitz.

Coming up with points for units is not as simple as it sounds, you can decide points on certain aspects by some basic maths, but for others you have to make an educated guess at times and then play test them out.

One thing I’ve realised, is that there is often a base cost and an uplift cost to the units.

The base cost will take account of the units essential core points such as their morale value, movement, weapon range and any other elements of the points which are ‘static’ – by which I mean points that are not affected by the increased numbers of men inside the unit.

The uplift cost is the cost of points for every tier of the unit as it increases in size. This will be such things as the number of firing dice, any special rules etc.

What I’m outlining below is just the start of the very first written draft of the points formula, as play testing continues this could very change drastically as I learn new methods or the formula is tweaked here and there.

The first thing I need to start with is a base cost….

MORALE POINTS

To create the base cost I need a starting value to work to. This is hopefully fairly simple as Morale is the most important value at present, as units are removed from play if their morale falls to zero.

Therefore let’s assume at this point that every pip of morale is worth 1 point. However morale is dependent on a dice roll so the higher the morale the more likely morale is passed, therefore we must start with the lowest possible morale of 2 on 2D6 and assign this a value while using it as a baseline to then calculate the points for the morale value of units. Once we have this we increase each further pip of morale by the percentage likelihood of rolling that number or less on 2D6. For Example, to roll 2 on 2D6 you have a 3% chance, for a roll of 3 or less on 2D6 you have an 8% chance. So it would seem logical to take your base line number and increase its value by 5% (the difference between 3% and 8%).

The chances of each roll or less on 2D6 are shown below.

Roll on 2D6Chance
23%
38%
417%
528%
642%
758%
872%
983%
1092%
1197%
12100%
Chance of value rolls or less on 2D6

If we assigned points of 5 or less to the lowest morale value of then the escalation up to 12 would be barely noticeable and wouldn’t see much of a difference between units.

Therefore lets assign 10 points to the morale value of 2 and work up the ladder of morale from this point.

MoraleChanceDifferencePoints
23%= 10
38%5%(10 x 5%) + 10 = 10.5
417%9%(10.5 x 9%) + 10.5 = 11.445
528%11%(11.445 x 11%) + 11.445 = 12.704
642%14%(12.704 x 14%) + 12.704 = 14.483
758%16%(14.483 x 16%) + 14.483 = 16.8
872%14%(16.8 x 14%) + 16.8 = 19.152
983%11%(19.152 x 11%) + 19.152 = 21.258
1092%9%(21.258 x 9%) + 21.258 = 23.172
1197%5%(23.172 x 5%) + 23.172 = 24.33
12100%3%(24.33 x 3%) + 24.33 = 25.06
Calculation for Morale points worth

Normally I would round these figure to the nearest whole number, however as there will be other factors coming into play onto the base points of a unit we’ll leave this until we’ve completed the full calculations.

We have three tiers of units at present each with their own morale values. Recruit, Trained and Experience. As a recruit starts with a morale of 5 their base points will begin at 12.704, Trained at morale 6 will be 14.483 and Experienced will be 16.8.

Unit ExperiencePoints
Recruit12.704
Trained14.483
Experienced16.8
Unit Experience as Points Values

Note here, that if we had used the base value as 1 instead of 10 the decimal point above would move to the left and so recruit would have been 1.2704, trained, 1.4483 and experienced 1.68 – not so much of a difference.

I hope this has all made sense so far, but please feel free to drop a comment below if you’d like me to go over anything. I’ve probably gone about this in a cack-handed way (not being a statistician and everything) so if anyone has any suggestions please let me know.

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

Advertisements

Russian Artillery Units

Up to the Austerlitz campaign the Russian artillery was often found to be woefully under prepared, with the Russians only able to carry half of the ammunition the Austrians could in their caissons. The horse were also underfed and badly tended. This was to change however with Sir Wilson (who was attached to the Russian army during the campaign) noting “The Russian artillery is of the most powerful description. No other army moves with so many guns, and with no other army is it in better state of equipment, or is more gallantly served.”

George Nafziger considered the Russian artillery in 1812 as:

highly professional and very well trained” and their horses as “the finest horses available“. About the unicorns he wrote that they “had a greater range and more accuracy than the howitzers used by the other European armies.

Nafziger – Napoleon’s Invasion of Russia

In 1812 the field artillery consisted of:

  • 176 12pdr cannons
  • 524 6pdr cannons
  • 524 foot unicorns (10pdr and 20pdr)
  • 132 6pdr horse cannons
  • 132 horse unicorns (10pdr)

Pieces were formed into platoons of two guns, two of which (4 guns) formed a division. Three platoons (6 guns) formed a half-company, and two half-companies (12 guns) formed a company. In combat the companies guns were placed 8 cannon to the centre and 2 unicorns on either flank.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-15.png
taken with thanks from http://www.napoleonguide.com

Using the table above we can establish the ranges of the Russian weapons in the scale we’re using (1:5300).

WeaponMaximum RangeEffective Range
6 Pounder Cannon25cm16cm
12 Pounder Cannon34cm16cm
Unicorns42cm12cm
Russian Artillery Ranges at 1/5300 scale

Unit Attributes

Russian Artillery Unit Card

Special Rules

Artillery – When in melee this unit halves its combat dice.

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

Advertisements

The Rulebook

Firstly apologies that I’ve not been as active recently with the website, but I promise you that work has continued unabated in the back ground.

As such, I wanted to share with you what the Rulebook looks like so far for Clausewitz. I’m hoping that I’ll be able to produce this in full colour on its completion, though to do so I will need to start raising funds soon!

The artwork included is original artwork commissioned for this project and drawn by Tom Pennifold with my heartfelt gratitude. Tom’s unique style enables the rulebook to stand out from a crowd and allows me to break up large boxes of text with his fantastic pieces. I’ve not labelled who all the characters are yet, I’ll let you all take guesses.

The play test team will also have copies and as a thank you anyone who commits to playtesting and provides me with feedback will receive a free PDF copy (if not a full printed colour copy) of the Rulebook when the time comes as well as a special mention in the credits.

Again, apologies for the wait, but great things are coming!

Download the WIP rulebook here:

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

Advertisements

Russian Cavalry Units

The basic cavalry unit of the Russian army during the Napoleonic period was the Squadron with each squadron having 16 flankers (Skirmishers) with all Hussar troopers being trained as skirmishers. The Cavalry was split between Guard Cavalry and Army Cavalry, with varied types of Cavalry all assigned to the Guard Cavalry. In 1805 the Guard Cavalry was made up of two Cuirassier, one Hussar and 1 Cossack Regiments in the Guard, while there were six Cuirassier, twenty Dragoon, three Horse Jagers, one Uhland and nine Hussar regiments in the main army.

COSSACKS

These are in all likelihood the most famous units of Cavalry in the Russian army during the time of the Napoleonic Wars. There were large numbers of these troops that Russia could call upon (77,000 in 1795). Originally from the descendants of outlaws who settled in southern Russia these troops were often led by their tribal Chiefs or Atamans and although they would seldom have much effect on disciplined enemy unit they were extremely useful when it came to such aspects as scouting, raiding or skirmishing. Their large number which accompanied by their war cry would strike fear into many enemies. With terrible discipline these troops were often seen as robbers, looters and drunks.

These troops were armed with a variety of weapons which would usually be in the form of lances or firearms and although some of the Cossacks would have uniforms many were outfitted in their own tribal manner.

Unit Attributes

Russian Cossacks

Units of Cossacks were included in the Imperial Guard, if you wish to upgrade a unit to an Imperial Guard Cossack unit, then change their ‘Steady’ roll to 4+ and their base morale to 8, also remove their undisciplined special rule.

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Cossacks are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-2) – Units of Cossacks have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Cossacks suffer a -2 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (5+) – Cossacks occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 5+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Cossacks allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Undisciplined – Units of Cossacks are usually nothing more than tribesmen used to living in harsh conditions and as such are not used to facing disciplined enemy cavalry. As such any cavalry units with Cavalry special rules affect Cossack units.

CUIRASSIERS

The name Cuirassier comes from the name of the breastplate armour that the cavalry wore; the Cuirass. They were also armed with a brace of pistols as well as a heavy pallash and a carbine or rifle. In 1812 the Carbine and Rifles were taken away leaving the Cuirassiers with only a brace of pistols and a sword.

Unit Attributes

Russian Cuirassiers Unit Card

Units of Cuirassiers were included in the Imperial Guard, if you wish to upgrade a unit to an Imperial Guard Cuirassier unit, then change their ‘Steady’ roll to 4+ and their base morale to 8.

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Cuirassiers are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-2) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Cuirassiers suffer a -2 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (3+) – Cuirassiers occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 3+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.

DRAGOONS

Dragoons were armed with a brace of pistols a straight sabre and a musket. Each squadron also had men armed with rifles.

Unit Attributes

Russian Dragoon Unit Card

Units of Dragoons were included in the Imperial Guard, if you wish to upgrade a unit to an Imperial Guard Dragoon unit, then change their ‘Steady’ roll to 4+ and their base morale to 8.

Special Rules

  • Muskets – Dragoons are armed Muskets. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its Muskets once an enemy closes within range. Muskets have a long range of 4cm and short range of 2cm.
  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Dragoons suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (4+) – Dragoons occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 4+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Rifles – During an action the unit can choose to fire its rifles instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the rifle weapon profile (long Range 8cm / Effective Range 4cm).

HORSE JAGERS

Russian horse Jagers were the equivalent of the French Chassuers-a-Cheval and were another aspect to Russia’s extensive light cavalry. Horse Jager troops were armed with a sabre, two pistols and a carbine.

Unit Attributes

Horse Jager Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Horse Jagers suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (4+) – Horse Jagers occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 4+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Pistols – Horse Jagers are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Horse Jagers allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.

UHLANS

Before the Battle of Austerlitz there were three horse regiments: Polish, Lithuania and Tartar, and a single Uhlan regiment, the Grand Duke Constantine Uhlans. In 1807 the horse regiments were changed to Uhlan regiments.

Uhlans were recruited mainly from Poles and Lithuanians living in western Russia.

Russian generals had mixed feelings about their Polish and Lithuanian cavalrymen. The problem was not their horsemanship and skills with weapon, but with their commitment to Russia. In the summer of 1812 the Uhlan regiments had several times more deserters and missing men than casualties in combat. For this reason General Bagration, didn’t want the Lithuanian Uhlan Regiment being included in his rear guard.

The Uhlans were armed with sabres, pistols and a lance. Flankers in Uhlan regiments also carried Rifles.

Unit Attributes

Russian Uhlans Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Uhlans suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (4+) – Uhlans occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 4+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Pistols – Uhlans are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Uhlans allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Rifles – During an action the unit can choose to fire its rifles instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the rifle weapon profile (long Range 8cm / Effective Range 4cm).

HUSSARS

“Honour of your regiment – is honour of your family”

– Russian Hussar saying

In no other branch of the army, were there so many volunteers. Many came from families with a long military tradition and were excellent swordsmen and men who were raised as horse riders. Hussars’ gaiety around a bottle of wine, or vodka, and their rolling swagger were well known. Opening the bottle of wine with a sabre cut and drinking from woman’s shoe were just two of their many customs. In every hussar regiment their existed a camaraderie and pride of belonging to a special group within the army.

Hussars were armed with a sabre, two pistols and a carbine with flankers also issued a musketoon.

Unit Attributes

Russian Hussars Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Hussars suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (5+) – Hussars occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 5+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Pistols – Hussars are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Hussars allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Muskets – During an action the unit can choose to fire its Muskets instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the Musket weapon profile (long Range 4cm / Effective Range 2cm).

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

Advertisements

Russian Infantry Units

“The Russians had to be beaten down man by man … our soldiers fired upon them at 25 paces, they continued their march without replying, every regiment filed past, without saying a word, or slackening its pace for a moment. The streets were filled with dying and wounded, but not a groan was heard … you might have said that they were firing at shadows. At last our soldiers charged the Russian soldiers with the bayonet, and only when they pierced them could they be convinced that they were dealing with men.”

Baron de Marbot – Battle of Golymin
General Raievski and the Russian Infantry in 1812

According to the French author Loraine Petre the stamina of Russian foot troops were incredible. The Russians were able to march for days at a time at night and still have the energy to fight in battle, all with very little rest or food.

The vast majority of Russian infantry were uneducated country people. Their illiteracy ratio was higher than that of any other European country at the time with only 1 private in 24 being able to read and write in the 1790’s. Even among the NCO’s 1 in 6 corporals and 4 in 14 sergeants were literate.

The Russians also had a reputation for drinking, with the troopers receiving 3/8 litre of ‘liquor’. Anything stronger than beer was often diluted. According to Bulgarin, in the Battle of Heilsberg (1807), Grand Duke Constantine brought two wagons of ‘Grain Wine’ and Suhary for his Uhlan regiment before they were to go into action.

“When they are on the offensive they are fortified by copious distributions of alcohol, and they attack with a courage which verges on a frenzy, and would rather get killed than fall back. The only way to make them desist is to kill a great number of their officers .. The Russian infantry withstand fire fearlessly, but their own fire is badly directed .. they are machines which are actuated only by the orders of their officers.”

Tedd Kosciuszko – Polish revolutionary leader

Each Russian regiment was made up of three battalions of four companies, Grenadier Regiments had one Grenadier battalions and two fusilier battalions. Musketier (Musketeer) regiments had one Grenadier battalion and two Musketeer battalions, while Jager regiments were composed of three Jager battalions.

Like my articles for the Austrian forces, I will run through each unit type and then summarise their unit attributes and any special rules at the end of their sections.

LINE INFANTRY

“The bullet’s an idiot, the bayonets a fine chap’

“Pulia duraka, no shtyk molodets” – Suvorovian Motto

The Russian weaponry was often a mix of different calibre muskets as well as muskets from foreign nations in addition to their own. Many muskets were so old and worn out from firing that they would no longer function.

There were thousands of captured weapons, and the Russians considered the French ‘Charleville’ musket as the lightest and best made, the British ‘Brown Bess’ was larger but more durable while the Prussian, Swedish and old Russian muskets were considered unwieldly.

Between 1803 and 1812 the Russian factories in Tula issued 20,000 rifles, but this was withdrawn in June 1808 and used only by NCO’s and 12 marksmen in a line infantry’s Jaeger company.

Unit Attributes

Russian Line Infantry

Special Rules

  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).

GUARD INFANTRY

The elite of the Russian infantry, which were comparable to the French Guard units. The officers of Guard infantry were from nobility and were treated as two ranks above their counterparts in the other infantry regiments, while NCO’s were treated as a rank higher.

The guard received the best uniforms, the best weapons and the best recruits. Tsar Paul revised the Guard and imposed discipline and accountability on its commanders. Tsar Paul also removed all officers not on active duty and the Guard were to learn the Prussian drill which at that time was considered to be the best in Europe. Tsar Paul was eventually murdered, some of those involved in his murder were Officers of the Guard…. His son Alexander took the Guard to battle at every opportunity which garnered them experience and soon made them some of the best troops in Europe. They became particularly well known for their endurance.

Unit Attributes

Russian Guard Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Brave – Each turn a unit with this ability may automatically pass one morale test.
  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).

JAGERS

The Russian troops were assigned regiments depending on their stature. The tallest would become Grenadiers, while the smallest would become Jagers. This changed later in the war when in 1811 Field Marshal Barclay de Tolly changed the system so that personal merit and worth determined a man’s assignment.

Jagers were the standard Russian light infantry unit, and while classified as light troops their skirmishing ability was almost non-existent. The majority were armed with Muskets, while a few 12 sharpshooters in each company were equipped with Rifles.

Unit Attributes

Russia Jager Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Jagers allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.

OPOLCHENIE

Raised in 1812 as part of the defence of Russia from Napoleon. These makeshift units were poorly armed and poorly trained. There were often not even enough muskets for each man, and instead pikes were issued where muskets were not.

Unit Attributes

Russian Opolchenie Unit Card

Special Rules

None

WHY NOT JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

SOURCES

http://napolun.com/mirror/napoleonistyka.atspace.com/Russian_guard.htm

https://www.napoleon-series.org/military-info/organization/c_russianskirm.html

http://www.theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=212800

https://blundersonthedanube.blogspot.com/2012/02/russian-opolchenie-militia-1812.html

Advertisements

Artwork for the Rulebook

This is a quick post to firstly apologise, as I haven’t been to active recently (in the foreground anyway) due to a number of issues which I won’t bore you with.

The rules writing is continuing in the back ground and I am currently putting together the Russian Infantry article, which should be up later this week.

I’ve also managed to procure the services of a very talented artist who I have purchased some original art work for the rule book. Early days I know, but this is how dedicated I am.

I’ve included the first piece below, there are no prizes for guessing who this is of!

Everyone’s favourite

Tom is a fantastic artist and I would urge you to visit his instagram account to see his other works. Perhaps even purchase a self portrait from him!

WHY NOT JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

Austrian Artillery Units

Artillery Officer, Gunner and Train Driver 1809-1813, by Ottenfeld

Austrian artillery units before the Napoleonic Wars were held in high regard by the other nations of the world and were often thought of as the best artillery units. Men volunteered for the artillery units of Austria and were not recruited, all the rank and file were able to read and write in German. Enlistments were for 14 years in the artillery, while a member of the Austrian infantry was enlisted for only 6 years.

Several French generals including Massena admired the Austrian artillery and its professionalism, and the Austrians had both gunpowder and ammunition of higher quality than that of the other nations. However, while the Austrian artillery units were extremely professional and benefited from higher quality supplies the French and many other nations artillery had a larger calibre and further reach than the Austrian weapons.

The accuracy of Austrian artillery far appeared to be superior to that of the other major nations. At the Battle of Leipzig in 1813 a duel occurred between 12 Austrian guns and 21 Saxon and French guns near Paunsdorf. After 30 minutes of fire and despite being outnumbered almost 2 to 1 the Austrian gunners had lost six of their guns while the Saxons and French had lost seven.

www.napoleonguide.com has a very handy table showing the different ranges of the Napoleonic guns of each nation at the time. I’ve summarised this below into the 1/5300 basic scale for Clausewitz.

WeaponMaximum RangeEffective Range
3 Pounder Cannon16 cm8 cm
6 Pounder Cannon17 cm9 cm
12 Pounder Cannon21 cm12 cm
7 Pounder Howitzer23 cm12 cm
Austrian Artillery Ranges at 1/5300 scale

Unit Attributes

Austrian Artillery Unit Card

Special Rules

Artillery – When in melee this unit halves its combat dice.

JOIN OUR DISCORD COMMUNITY

Discord

SOURCES

http://www.napolun.com/mirror/web2.airmail.net/napoleon/Austrian_artillery.htm

https://www.napoleonguide.com/artillery_ranges.htm

Austrian Cavalry Units

Austrian cavalry contained Cuirassiers, Dragoons, Chaveauxlegers (Light Dragoons), Hussars and Uhlans. All were well trained, well mounted and had a good reputation across Europe.

Much like the article I wrote on the Infantry units for Austria, I’ll run through each type of cavalry and then define their attributes and any special rules after doing so.

CUIRASSIERS

Austrian Cuirassiers being ambushed by French Cavalry

Austrian had eight regiments of Cuirassiers, which were fewer than some of the other nations such as France who had between twelve to fifteen and Russia who has ten to twelve.

In 1809 a regiment of Cuirassiers consisted of 975 men across six squadrons, in 1812 this was changed to four squadrons of 144 men each.

The name Cuirassier comes from the name of the breastplate armour that the cavalry wore; the Cuirass. They were also armed with a brace of pistols as well as a straight broadsword. Each squadron of Cuirassiers had eight men armed with rifles and eight with carbines.

Unit Attributes

Austrian Cuirassiers Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Cuirassiers are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Uhlans suffer a -2 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (3+) – Uhlans occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 3+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.

DRAGOONS

The Austrians possessed six regiments of Dragoons and six of Chevaulegers. Dragoons were armed with carbines and the heavy pallasch. Each squadron had sixteen men armed with rifles.

Unit Attributes

Austrian Dragoons Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Dragoons are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Dragoons suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (4+) – Dragoons occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 4+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Rifles – During an action the unit can choose to fire its rifles instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the rifle weapon profile (long Range 8cm / Effective Range 4cm).

UHLANS

Austrian Uhlan

“I saw a great many French horse carabiniers with lace wounds …”

Dezydery Chlapowski

Austrian has three regiments of Uhlans, and in 1814 formed a fourth regiment. In comparison France had nine lancer regiments and Russia increased the number of their own Uhlan regiments from two to twelve.

Uhlans were armed with pistols, curved sabres and a lance. Each squadron had eight men armed with rifles and eight with carbines. A Uhlan regiment was divided into four divisions, with the central two divisions armed with lances while the flanking divisions were armed with carbines.

Unit Atrributes

Austrian Uhlans Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Uhlans are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Uhlans suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (4+) – Uhlans occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 4+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Rifles – During an action the unit can choose to fire its rifles instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the rifle weapon profile (long Range 8cm / Effective Range 4cm).

CHEVAULEGERS

“…was of the opinion than, as I am still today, that the Austrian light horse is the best trained in this kind of warfare [skirmish]. The Austrians are always the most skilled at placing outposts to guard their army.”

Chlapowski/Simmons – “Memoirs of a Polish Lancer” P15

As of 1802 there were six regiments of Chevaulegers with a seventh being formed in 1814.

Chevaulegers carried a carbine and a sabre, with each squadron having sixteen men armed with rifles.

The Austrian Chevaulegers formed large regiments and served effectively in pitched battles while also being effective in escort duty, skirmishers and in smaller engagements.

Unit Attributes

Austrian Chevaulegers Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Chevaulegers are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its pistols once an enemy closes within range. Pistols have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Chevaulegers suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (5+) – Chevaulegers occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 4+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Rifles – During an action the unit can choose to fire its rifles instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the rifle weapon profile (long Range 8cm / Effective Range 4cm).
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Chevaulegers allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.

HUSSARS

Austria had twelve Hussar regiments, eight from Hungary, two from Transylvania and two from Slovakia. The name ‘Hussar’ derives from the Latin word Cursarius which means raider, and originally was used to refer to marauders from the Northern Balkans. It was later adopted by the Magyar people of Hungary as the name for irregular light cavalry.

Hussars carried a large sabre and a carbine. There were six sharpshooters in each squadron carrying rifles.

Unit Attributes

Austrian Hussars Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Pistols – Hussars are armed with short ranged weaponry. If the player wishes, this unit may fire its carbines once an enemy closes within range. Carbines have a long range of 2cm and short range of 1cm.
  • Cavalry (-1) – Units of this calibre have a fearsome reputation on the battlefield. As such any enemy foot units that are within 10cm of a unit of Hussars suffer a -1 modifier to any morale checks that the unit makes.
  • Impetuous (3+) – Hussars occasionally struggle to maintain their composure in the heat of battle. After this unit has fought in melee, during its next action roll a D6; on a roll of 3+ the unit can act normally, if the unit fails this roll it must make its quickest move towards the nearest enemy unit and contact them in melee if possible.
  • Rifles – During an action the unit can choose to fire its rifles instead of performing any other action. If it does so it can use 1 combat dice and fire at the enemy using the rifle weapon profile (long Range 8cm / Effective Range 4cm).
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Hussars allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.

Austrian Cavalry Unit Card

Below is the full unit card for the Austrian Cavalry. Pistols will be removed from the special rules and have their profiles included elsewhere once the full rules are published.

As always, if you have any suggestions, thoughts or comments please let me know.

Austrian Cavalry Unit Card

WHY NOT JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

OUR DISCORD SERVER

OUR WHATSAPP CHAT

OUR TABLETOP SIMULATOR MOD

JOIN OUR DISCORD COMMUNITY

https://discord.gg/wndq6rN

SOURCES

https://www.napoleon-series.org/military-info/organization/Austria/ArmyStudy/c_AustrianArmyCavalry.html#:~:text=The%20Austrian%20cavalry%20consisted%20of,wore%20white%20coats%20and%20breeches.

http://napoleonistyka.atspace.com/Austrian_cavalry.htm#_cuirassiers