Category Archives: Infantry

Clausewitz (A Synopsis)

It’s been a fair while since I’ve written anything and for that I sincerely apologise.

Life, as always gets in the way of planning a good wargames ruleset.

After such a long time I thought it would be best to summarise what the rules look like so far (including changes to the command and control).

Deployment


Each player has a number of deployment markers (min 5), which they will use to determine their deployment area. Players can be granted additional deployment markers if their army possess units with the “Deployment Marker” special rule.

After a roll off the winner decides which table edge they would like and the loser takes a marker and places it in contact with their own board edge, they then move this marker 15cm. The other player does the same.

On the players second deployment turn, the can choose either to place another of their markers on the table and move that (as they did in the first deployment turn), or they can choose to move their original marker another 15cm.

All markers must either be within 30cm of a table edge or 30 cm of another friendly marker. If a marker moves to within 30cm of an enemy marker    then both markers remain at 30cm apart and are considered “locked”.

Both players continue to move their markers until all markers have been locked.  The players may then deploy their units in their deployment zone which has been determined by the area in which their deployment markers enclose.

Game Essentials

The game takes place across 30 turns, with each turn representing 10 minutes of battle. Players start with five chips placed in a bag which represents their Commanders-in-Chief’s actions. Chips are drawn at random and the colour of the chip determines who acts.

Generals must spend actions to activate their divisional generals. This is done by sending an ADC marker to the divisional general, once this reaches the general they are given a objective number as their target in the game. From this point onwards that divisional general and their units can only score victory points for claiming that objective.

Each additional general activated adds a further five chips to the bag for that force.

Command and Control


Each unit and each General in a game of Clausewitz has a rating of 1 to 5. When ordering units to act the owning player must roll equal to or higher than the combined rating of the general issuing the order and the unit receiving the order.

Generals of Division can only issue orders to their own Division, Commanders-in-Chief may issue orders to any units. An order costs a general one of their actions.

The distance between the target unit and the general also has an impact on how effective that unit may be. For every 8cm of distance between the two the target unit loses an action point that turn.

Units

Units in Clausewitz is considered to be a number of bases which represents the battalions or squadrons along with the Brigade General.

Each Brigade has a number of stats. Morale and actions; both of which are shown on the brigade generals base, and Combat Dice and formation and which are shown on the battalion and squadron bases.

Each unit also has stats for how well they are able to fire their weapons and how effective they are in combat.

Brigades have five actions, which can range from changing formation, firing and movement.

Game Mechanics

I have the overall aim of making Clausewitz simple to play but also with a realistic element to its general play. For example the orders system where units need to receive orders from their general before moving or attacking and those generals in turn needing to receive objectives before acting themselves.

Movement is all based on the historical information of unit marching distances. Therefore in a ten minute turn you’ll find using all five actions on a unit of line infantry will move them 10cm which equates to roughly a third of a mile.

Firing is done by actions as well with each unit able to use its combat dice to shoot, first rolling for their steady roll (usually 5+) with any successes here being rolled for hits. The range of the weapons are also historically accurate with muskets having a long range of 4cm and effective range of 2cm.

Formations have different effect on the units themselves. With column being able to move at a quick march rate but being vulnerable to artillery and small arms fire. Line formations effective at shooting but awful when charges by the enemy.

Morale is always the key in this game and sometimes if you find an attack has not been successful it may be wise to return the attacking troops to your own lines to allow them to recuperate.

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Rulebook Adjustments

So following on from some further testing carried out by members of the Discord server this week, they made some excellent points in regards to some of the rules I’m going to mention below.

FIRING
It’s become more clear with testing that its not entirely clear which units can fire when performing a firing action. Therefore I’ve changed the Fire! action to read as:

Fire! (Cost: 1 Action Point) Offensive or Defensive The Brigade can fire all its available combat dice assigned to the units at the front of the Brigade. Each unit can fire at any units directly to their front.

ENFILADING FIRE
This is for units which are firing on the flank of battalions that are formed in line. I’ve added the following paragraph in the firing section:

Enfilading Fire
Units which fire on the flank of a unit in line formation are performing what is called enfilading fire, when this occurs the target unit receives double damage.

FLANK AND REAR ATTACKS IN MELEE
I’ve added the following section to the rulebook under melee:

Flank and Rear Attacks
Units which are attacking the enemy in the flank receive a +1 modifier to their combat dice roll, while units attacking an enemy in its rear benefits from a +2 modifier.

MINIMUM FLEEING DISTANCES
It became apparent through testing that units could take advantage of units that were fleeing but unable to move due to having no actions left and so being able to constantly cause damage to them. Therefore I’m replacing the following wording:

If the unit fails by a value of more than 2 then the unit will flee the remaining number of actions at 3cm per action and end its turn facing directly away from the enemy

With:

If the unit fails by a value of more than 2 then the unit will flee 3cm away from the enemy plus its remaining number of actions at 3cm per action and end its turn facing directly away from the enemy

FORMATIONS
I’d forgotten to clarify in previous versions how many combat dice can be used by each unit depending upon their formation. Therefore I’ve added a Benefits and Cons section to each in the rule book:

Line
Benefits: Can use all combat dice when firing. Does not suffer extra damage from artillery attacks.
Cons: Cannot use the quick march action. Can be vulnerable to cavalry attacks.

Column
Benefits: Can use the quick march action and the Brigade benefits from +1 to their morale rolls for each unit inside the Brigade in this formation. Cavalry effects are reduced.
Cons: Can only use a quarter of their combat dice (rounded up).

Square
Benefits: Cannot be charged by Cavalry and the Brigade benefits from +1 to their morale rolls for each unit inside the Brigade in this formation.  
Cons: Can only use a quarter of their combat dice (rounded up). Cannot move.

CHANGE BRIGADE FORMATION
I’ve changed this slightly so that Brigades can only be a max of three units wide.

OTHER NOTES

A speed play option has also been suggested, this is being considered further.

All of the above changes will be reflected in version 0.3.2 which will be released on the website and on the steam mod on Sunday (possibly along with the Russian army).

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Revised Russian Units for v0.3.1

Following the updated rulebook I’ve re-written the Russian unit stats to go alongside these.

INFANTRY UNITS

Russian Infantry Units

You’ll see that I’ve divided the main infantry (line and light) into three rungs of Recruit, Trained and Veteran. This is to reflect the training and experience of units in campaign situations. If playing matched play games I would advise using trained units a base.

CAVALRY UNITS

Russian Cavalry Units

Any of the above can also be included in the Russian Imperial Guard, if you are taking any of these units as Imperial Guard, then include the Drilled special rule and in the case of Cossacks remove their Cossacks special rule.

ARTILLERY UNITS

Russian Artillery Units

A half company of Russian artillery contained six pieces, and in the case where 6 pounder cannons were used there were four cannon and two unicorn howitzers.

Once again, any artillery units that included as part of the guard add the Drilled special rule.

As always if I’ve made a mistake or you believe something needs to be revised please let me know in the comments.

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Clausewitz Available on Steam Workshop for Tabletop Simulator

Okay, this is a pretty big deal for me. I’ve spent the last week and a half putting the finishing touches to the Clausewitz Mod for Tabletop Simulator!

This is available to download now from the Steam Workshop.

The mod includes all of the British and French units, and future updates will include other armies and terrain.

Now you too can playtest Clausewitz without the need for miniatures or even a tabletop!

Please try it today and pass any feedback you have to clausewitz.tabletop@gmail.com

Screenshots below:

Vimeiro Battlefield
The French Grande Armee
The British Army
The French attack a British position

Grand Scale Battles
It even includes a copy of the latest draft rules!

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How Brigades Work

As part of the recent revision to the rules I’ve gone back and rejigged the unit and Brigade profiles.

HOW IT WORKS

When organising their order of battle each general will either purchase a number of Brigades or (in the case of historic battles) take the number as given on the historic order of battle. The Brigade card will look like this:

Brigade Card Ready for Battle

You would purchase you initial Brigade and in matched play games this costs you a certain amount of points in itself. From that point on you add battalions, squadrons or batteries to then buff those initial statistics. So in the case above, we can see that each Line Regiment added is improving the Morale roll the Brigade would need by a further one, meaning once they’ve all been added and it comes to taking their first morale test in battle the Brigade would need a 5+ to pass. Most factions will either be all foot or all horse, only a few factions had a mixture of both, but these will be published with those factions.

COMMAND
This is the value needed to pass in order for that unit to carry out its actions. Only elite units will alter this in any way, the player must instead use command points from a nearby general to boost these in the turn. For example, the player chooses to activate his general first and uses 3 of his 5 command points to boost the above Brigade to Command 6+ instead of 9+.

MORALE
As in previous iterations of the rules this stat is how confident the Brigade is in battle, the number signified is what would be needed to pass a morale test in game. This number may often be modified by other in game factors such as nearby Cavalry, the formation of the units inside the Brigade and any damage received to the Brigade.

STRENGTH
This is an optional statistic for those wishing to compare their losses in game to that of the actual General who commanded in the field at the time. For each hit received on the Brigade this figure reduces by one and cannot be recovered unlike morale. At the end of the game the general deducts his final strength from his starting strength and multiplies the value by 50 to give an estimate on the number of men killed or wounded. e.g., the British Brigade begins the battle with strength 50, and at the end of the game has been reduced to strength 43, meaning a loss of 7 strength. This converts into 350 men killed or wounded (7 x 50 = 350).

STEADY
Steady represents the first roll of the firing phase for any ranged weapon dice. The player needs to score equal to or higher than this value for the player then to roll successes on their ‘Fire!’ roll.

COMBAT WEAPON
This weapon is the standard weapon of the standard trooper inside that unit.

COMBAT DICE
For a historic engagement combat dice is determined by using the number of men for each unit on the order of battle divided by a factor of 200. In matched play, combat dice are purchased individually each time.

For example an order of battle may show that a unit had 970 men, this figure is divided by 200 and rounded off to give the combat dice (970 / 200 = 4.85 (5 Dice)), or in the case above Brigade would be purchase for 57 Points, then a Regiment of Foot (which includes 1 combat die) is purchased for 43 points, each combat die for that regiment after that initial purchase may cost an additional 2 points, so a regiment of foot with 5 combat dice would cost 51 points (43 + 2 + 2 + 2+ 2).

SKIRMISH WEAPONS
If the unit is able to skirmish the weapon the use in doing so will be shown here. Often this is the same weapon, however in some cases such as some Austrian infantry units, the skirmishers of a unit may have been armed with Rifles instead of Muskets.

SKIRMISH DICE
A unit which has skirmish weapons will be granted 1 Skirmish Dice. One is the limit to Skirmish dice and no additional skirmish dice can be purchased. If the unit can skirmish, the cost of this skirmish dice is included in the unit cost when purchased.

ARTILLERY WEAPONS
This specifies any weapons that the unit uses as artillery.

ARTILLERY DICE
Artillery can be fired as an action. If the Brigade possess any Artillery this is fired in the same way as Combat or Skirmish Dice.

CC V INFANTRY
This denotes the dice roll required to cause a hit on this troop type in melee. Other external factors can also modify these rolls such as terrain.

CC V CAVALRY
This denotes the dice roll required to cause a hit on this troop type in melee. Other external factors can also modify these rolls such as terrain.

SAVE
Some units may have a save stat as part of their attributes, if so once damage has been dealt to the unit roll a D6 for each hit. On a roll of the value or above that damage is ignored. Some terrain such as Woods or Villages also grant saves and are specified in the terrain section of the Rulebook.

SPECIAL RULES
Often units will be added to the Brigade which contain special rules, these will vary from such things as Deployment Marker (granting the player an extra deployment marker in the scouting phase) to Marksmen (re-rolling one Fire! dice per action). What each special rule does can be found in the Rulebook under the special rules section.

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French Infantry Units

The infantry was the core of every Napoleonic army and the French army was the largest in the world during these times. Having such a powerful army was necessary for France with enemies such as Prussia and Austria forming part of her land borders. The strength of the French infantry varied during the wars, at the beginning of Napoleon’s reign France had 90 line regiments and 26 light regiments, In 1813-1814 this reached a peak of 137 line and 35 light infantry units. At Waterloo this was reduced to 90 line regiments and only 14 light regiments.

The number of line regiments was almost identical to the number of departments in France (Similar to an English County). In 1790 France had been divided into 83 departments with 4-5 parts to each department. Each of these departments had to supply the army with 4-5 battalions of line Infantry.

The French operated under a levee en masse procedure where everyone of fighting age was signed up for military service to France should they be needed. This meant that Napoleon had a large amount of troops at his disposal should he need them. But these new recruits were very basically trained at the depot before joining their battalions where it was expected that the veterans of the battalion would pass on their knowledge to the newer members. This often meant that the level of training the infantrymen would receive would not be comparable to that of the other countries.

Line and light infantry both performed in similar capacities during the wars, but light infantry were trained more intensively in marksmanship and executing orders at higher speeds than their line counterparts. They also formed the advance guards and scouting parties of an army on the move.

1794 FIRST ORGANISATION OF THE FRENCH ARMY

Aleksandr Averyanov. The Struggle for the Bagration Strongpoint

In 1793-94 the French introduced the change moving their battalions into what would be called demi-brigades which consisted of three battalions of infantry. The second battalion would be made up of seasoned veterans who had already seen service, while the 1st and 3rd battalions would be made up of conscripts  and known as volunteer battalions.

Because of this the French developed the “Column of Attack’ as this required much less training of the conscripts rather than advancing in formed lines.

This structure of Demi-brigades lasted until 1803.

French Infantry 1793-1803

n.b. The maximum number of combat dice any of these units can have is five dice.

Special Rules (Light Infantry Only)

  • Deployment Marker – Units of Light Infantry allow the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Skirmishers – Light infantry are able to deploy skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers.

1803 SECOND ORGANISATION OF THE FRENCH ARMY

Napoleon reintroduced the term “regiment” as of 1803 and demi-brigade was only used from that point for provisional troops. At this point there were 90 line Infantry battalions of which 19 had four battalions and the remainder had three. Of these battalions one would be the depot battalion and the others would serve in the field. The light infantry had 3 regiments of four battalions and the other 24 had three battalions, once again with one battalion acting as a depot battalion.

1803 ‘war’ battalion

1 grenadier company (80-90 men)
8 fusilier companies (120 men)

Occasionally the Grenadier companies would be detached from their parent battalions and formed into Grenadier battalions or even entire Grenadier divisions.

In 1805 one of the fusilier companies of each battalion was converted into a Voltigeur company and in 1806 before going to war with Prussia the 3rd battalions were dissolved to replenish the 1st and 2nd battalions.

1805-1808 Battalion
1 Grenadier company (80-90 men)
7 Fusilier Companies (120 men)
1 Voltigeur company (120 men)

French Infantry 1805-1808

n.b. The maximum amount of combat dice these units can have is five.

Special Rules

  • Deployment Marker – Units of Light Infantry allow the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Skirmishers – French Light and Line Infantry are able to deploy skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers.
French Line Infantry

1808 THIRD ORGANISATION OF THE FRENCH ARMY

In 1808 Napoleon ordered the restructure of war battalions from nine companies to six stronger companies. Between 1808 and 1815 a battalion numbered 840 men in strength on paper, in reality a battalion would normally be between four to six hundred men in strength. Marshal Davout was of the opinion that a battalion of anything larger than 960 men was too cumbersome to be managed properly by its commanders.

1808 War Battalion
1 Grenadier company (140 men)
1 Voltigeur company (140 men)
4 Fusilier Companies (140 men each)

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-9.png
French Infantry 1808-1815

n.b. The maximum number of combat dice these units can have is 4.

Special Rules

  • Deployment Marker – Units of Light Infantry allow the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Skirmishers – French Light and Line Infantry are able to deploy skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers.

NATIONAL GUARD

Napoleon did not believe that the middle-class National Guard would be able to maintain order and suppress riots. Therefore, he created a Municipal Guard of Paris, a full-time gendarmerie which was strongly militarised. However, he did not abolish the National Guard, but was content to partially disarm it. He kept the force in reserve and mobilised it for the defence of French territory in 1809 and 1814. In Paris during this period the National Guard comprised twelve thousand bourgeois property owners, serving part-time and equipped at their own expense, whose prime function was to guard public buildings on a roster basis. Between 1811 and 1812 the National Guard was organized in “cohorts” to distinguish it from the regular army, and for home defence only. By a skilful appeal to patriotism, and judicious pressure applied through the prefects, it became a useful reservoir of half-trained men for new battalions of the active army.

After the disastrous campaign in Russia in 1812, dozens of National Guard cohorts were called up for field duty the next year; four cohorts being combined to form one line infantry regiment. The 135ème to 156ème Régiments d’Infanterie de Ligne were thus formed. Many of these fought in the campaigns in Germany in 1813 and the invasion of France by allied Austrian, Prussian, Russian and British armies in 1814. Existing National Guard units, such as those of Paris, were deployed as defence corps in their areas of recruitment. Mass conscription was extended to age groups previously exempt from military service, to provide more manpower for the expanded National Guard. Students and volunteers from gamekeepers and other professional groups formed separate units within the National Guard. Clothing and equipment was often in short supply and even the Paris National Guard was obliged to provide pikes as substitute weapons for some of its new recruits. These field and regional units were disbanded in 1814 after the abdication of Napoleon I.

Six thousand national guardsmen took part in the Battle of Paris in 1814. Following the occupation of Paris by the allied armies, the National Guard was expanded to 35,000 men and became the primary force for maintaining order within the city.

French National Guard

n.b. The maximum number of combat dice the national guard can have is five.

IRREGULAR INFANTRY

Chasseurs des Montagnes Uniform

There were several units of irregular infantry.

The chasseurs des montagnes were formed to deal with the Spanish irregulars, bandits and gangs of deserters along the French-Spanish border. They were uniformed in dark brown with sky-blue facings. They earned reputation as excellent guerrilla hunters and eradicators, specializing in swift cross-country movements. However, this unit was weak and had only 3 battalions of light infantry. Although these battalions were made of regular troopers their replacements were apprehended efractaires from the Pyrenees departments, who returned to duty under the pledge that they would serve only on the Spanish frontier. In 1814 the chasseurs des montagnes were disbanded and transferred to line and light regiments.

the miquelets francais was another unit formed on the Spanish border during 1792-94 and 1808-09.. It was an old French custom to recruit independent companies of Basques and smugglers for partisan mountain warfare. Moncey and Perignon commanded such units early in the Revolution. For many Frenchmen the Basques’ features suggested extreme ferocity. These irregulars were armed with very long-barrelled muskets with a set-trigger and pistols.

In 1815 Napoleon formed Chasseurs des Pyrenees to guard the Spanish frontier. Napoleon wanted nine battalions but the time was short and only seven and half were formed.

The Chasseurs des Alpes were formed in 1813 in preparation for an Austrian offensive in Italy and for fighting the Piedmontese Barbets. It had 1-2 battalions formed of former smugglers, poachers, gamekeepers and ordinary mountaineers. In 1814 the Bourbons disbanded this unit. In 1815 Napoleon formed 2 battalions.

The Chasseurs de la Reunion were formed as part of the garrison of the Isle de France (Mauritius). It was an all-black formation.

The cipayes (sepoys) were made of natives in India. There were only few companies and they were disbanded in 1803 when the small French colonies in India were lost to the British in 1803.

French Irregular Infantry

Special Rules

  • Deployment Marker – Units of Light Infantry allow the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Skirmishers – French Light and Line Infantry are able to deploy skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers.
  • Guerilla’s – Infantry of this type can move through Difficult terrain as though it was open ground and move through impassable terrain at movement of 2cm.

I hope you enjoyed this article, if you have any suggestions for improvement or you’d like to submit your results of playtesting please email me on Clausewitz.Tabletop@gmail.com

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Clausewitz Full Alpha Ruleset

The following is a full list of the Alpha rules. Please take your time to read through them or download the Word Document attached. I’m looking for feedback on everything from spelling, wording and location of paragraphs to feedback on rules etc. No opinion is a bad opinion and please be as thorough as you can! All people who provide feedback will be mentioned in the rulebook upon its release as a thank you. The word document attached has track changes on so please feel free to make as many changes as you like and send the document to clausewitz.tabletop@gmail.com

The rules below have been adjusted and all articles on the nations will be revisited to update the rules for the individual units.

Again, thank you to everyone who has helped me get this far with the rules but especially to Chris Pringle and Lehann who gave many a thoughtful idea or suggestion on the way!

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THE SCALE
Clausewitz has been designed for 6mm wargaming at a scale of 1:5300, which roughly equates to one 6mm figure representing 50 men. One foot equates to one mile.

There is nothing to stop players using other scales however, please see the section on ‘Other Miniature Scales’.

THE FIGURES AND BASING
Basing for the scale mentioned above is 40mm wide and 30mm deep, these apply to all types of units apart from Aide-de-camp (ADC’s) which can be represented on any small round base as a single mounted miniature.

Unit bases have two dice holders on each base at the back which represent the formation that Unit is in and the number of combat dice the Unit possess. Alternatively, these can be tracked using pen and paper.

Command bases are the same size as Unit bases with dice holders to represent the Brigades Actions, Morale and Strength.

ADC’s are a single miniature on a round base with a single dice holder representing an objective target (more on this later).

Each base represents a unit, this may be a Battalion (Infantry), Squadron (Cavalry) or Company (Artillery). These bases are grouped together into Brigades which are the main elements of any game. Bases inside a Brigade act together simultaneously.

THE BATTLEFIELD
A game of Clausewitz can be played on any size playing area but 6’x4′ is ideal for representing the larger battles of the time.

TERRAIN
There are various types of terrain that affect gameplay and are fall under different categories:

Open
This represents your standard rolling countryside and fields. Open has no effect on the outcome of the battle. Quick March can only be used on open terrain.

Units moving along roads can take advantage of a +1cm addition to their movement speed.

Rough
Rough ground can be anything from scrubland to ploughed fields. Units passing through rough terrain are unable to use Quick March.

Difficult
Units moving through difficult terrain halve their movement speed (rounded up) as they make certain of their footing.

Impassable
Only units with the special rule El Bruc may move through, down or up impassable terrain at a rate of 1cm per action. If this unit is inside a Brigade with other units that do not possess this special rule then the Brigade cannot take advantage of this rule.

Impassable terrain may be such areas like ravines or cliffs.

A section on terrain types is included towards the back of the rules with the different effects each terrain type has on play and their classification. For example, troops inside of woods receive a 6+ saving throw. Troops uphill in a melee to their enemy will receive a +1 to their combat dice roll.

BRIGADES
A Brigade is made up of a number of bases known as “Units” which represent Battalions, Cavalry or Artillery companies, or even a combination of all three in some instances. Each Unit will add its own attributes to that of the Brigade. As well as the Units mentioned above, there will also be a Brigadier General base (same base dimensions) who represents the Brigade command.

Each Brigade is made up of basic attributes which are enhanced by the units that are included within that Brigade. Brigades can be no larger than five troop bases and one command base. These attributes are:

Command: 8+
Before any actions are carried out by a Brigade, they must pass a command test. This must be a D6 roll higher than that specified on their Brigade card. This roll can be modified by nearby Generals who can add some of their command bonus to the roll to help the unit pass. If that unit fails its roll it cannot act that turn.

Morale 8+
Morale is used once the unit is within the Zone of Control of any enemy units. This will be modified by formations of units within the Brigade and also by the number of units inside the Brigade. Each Unit stand (not command stand) will add +1 to this roll. A Brigade cannot increase this beyond 3+ and a roll of 2 in 2D6 is always a failure.

Strength: 0
Strength is an optional attribute which the player can use to determine how many loss’s their army or Brigades suffered at the end of the battle. For every 50 men added to the Brigade increase this attribute by 1.

Steady 5+
This is the roll needed for the men in the Brigade to reload their weapons effectively under the gaze of the enemy and pluck up their courage to shoot at the men opposite them. Rolls which are successful can be rolled again in the ‘Fire!’ step of shooting. A ‘Fire!’ roll sees whether the Brigade hits its target, needing 4+ at effective range and 5+ at long range. Some elite units may boost this roll to a 4+ or perhaps grant re-rolls to a portion of the dice.

Combat Dice: 0
This is the number of dice the Brigade can use when it’s firing its weapons at the enemy or taking part in a melee action. As units are added to the Brigade the number of Combat Dice will increase in proportion with the size of the unit that is being added. A dice is added for every 200 men of a unit. When a Brigade takes any damage, for each damage roll a die on 5+ their Combat Dice pool is reduced by 1.

Skirmish Dice: 0
The number of skirmish dice assigned to the Brigade is determined by the number of light infantry units inside the Brigade and the number of other units with the Skirmishers special rule. For each 1000 men (rounded up) of a light infantry or unit with the Skirmishers special Rule, add 1 skirmish die. Skirmish dice are explained in greater detail later on in these rules.

Artillery Dice: 0
Each time Artillery units are assigned to the Brigade the Artillery dice pool is increased by one for each artillery piece that is added.

CC v Foot: 5+
This is the basic melee stat for all Brigades. When a Brigade meets an opposing foot unit in base-to-base contact on terrain that isn’t open, those Brigades will fight a melee action. Using their combat dice, rolls of equal or higher the value specified will result in a hit against the opposing Brigade.

CC v Mounted: 6+
This is the basic melee stat for all Brigades. When a Brigade meets an opposing mounted unit in base-to-base contact on terrain that isn’t open, those Brigades will fight a melee action. Using their combat dice, rolls of equal or higher the value specified will result in a hit against the opposing Brigade.

UNIT FORMATIONS
Foot units inside a Brigade can take on different formations depending on the situation they find themselves in. To change the formation for any units within the Brigade, the Brigade must use an action to change unit formations for one action point. The formations available to foot troops are:

Line Formation
The line formation allows the unit to fire all available combat dice assigned to it. Fire from artillery is less effective from the front and only causes half damage (half the damage from all incoming artillery fire and round up). Artillery fire directly into the flank of a line unit would cause double damage. (double all damage from incoming artillery fire). Units in line formation cannot use its quick march speed.

Column Formation
Any units that are in column formation grant the Brigade an additional one to its morale (remember that the Brigade morale cannot exceed 3+). Units in column formation can use the quick march pace. Columns are vulnerable to Artillery fire and so receive double damage from all incoming artillery attacks. Cavalry pose less of threat to units in column formation and therefore cannot charge them, the Cavalry special rule is reduced by one for Brigades that have their units in Columns (i.e., Cavalry (-2) is reduced to Cavalry (-1) and Cavalry (-1) is negated).

Square Formation
Used solely as a defensive formation any units in Square cannot move, and suffer double damage from artillery attacks. Cavalry cannot charge units in Square formation and their Cavalry special rule does not affect units in Square.

PLAY METHODS
Clausewitz can be used to either re-fight historical engagements where players can build an army using the order of battle at the time, or, as a points-based game where players build armies of equal value.

THE TURN

There are 30 turns to a game of Clausewitz, this represents 5 hours of battle. Players may wish to add more turns if they’re refiguring a historic engagement.

Each turn represents 10 minutes real time of battle, for example Turn 1 may represent the battle time between 9:50am and 10am.

OBJECTIVES
Each game will have a number of objectives on the battlefield which players will score points for holding. Objectives are numbered, and Brigades are given orders to hold these objectives. Brigades can only score victory points for their player if the Brigade has been designated to hold that objective by an ADC. At the end of each turn points are counted up and added to a running total.

GENERALS
Each player will be represented by a single base on the tabletop representing them as Commander-in-Chief (CinC). Players can move their commanders around the field of battle to issue orders to their Generals of Division (GD) or to their Brigadier Generals (BG) if playing in a smaller game.

The CinC can issue ADC’s to send orders to a General of Division or Brigade, when they do so an ADC base leaves the CinC with a dice representing the number of the objective that the Brigade can attack. A CinC can only issue one ADC per turn.

An ADC must first make base to base contact with the General of Division for that Brigade however (chain of command and all that). Once they have made contact the ADC can continue o. To the Brigade.

Generals of Division and the Commander-in-Chief all have 5 command points they can spend each turn if they’re withing a certain distance if any friendly Units. Command points can be used to buff a Brigades command stat to make it easier for them to enact orders that turn.

If Generals are in base-to-base contact with a friendly unit in melee with the enemy the General can also take part and adds one additional combat dice to the friendly Brigade in combat. This dice is the equivalent of the Generals personal guard, as elite fighters these will hit on 4’s in melee.

SCOUTING PHASE
Before deploying their unit’s players will enter a mini-game to determine their deployment areas. Each general will have a number of Deployment Markers which represent the number of Light Infantry or Light Cavalry in their army.

These Markers move at a rate of 15cm. The generals move these Markers across the table in alternate turns. Each marker must be within either 15cm of a board edge or another friendly marker. If at any point a marker moves to within 15cm of any of the opponent’s markers both their marker and their opponents are locked into position and cannot move any further. Once all markers are ‘locked’ the area those markers enclose represent the players deployment area. Players then place their units in the table alternately beginning with the player who locked all their markers first.

PLAYING THE GAME
There are no phases in Clausewitz, instead at the beginning of a game each player has a single-coloured die or chip which they place inside a bag. Shake the bag and draw, whoever’s die or chip is drawn may act with their CinC first. The CinC may either move 30cm OR issue an ADC to a Brigade.

Once the ADC reaches a General of Division or Brigade and has given them their objective that General or Brigade is considered to be ‘activated’.

Once a Brigade or General has been activated an additional chip or die for that player can be added to the draw bag for the next turn. When that player draws their chip the next turn, they can then choose which of their activated elements to use.

ACTIVATED ELEMENTS
Each element can use up to five actions per turn, some actions cost more than others a list of actions is shown later on.

Actions usually revolve around moving, changing formation or attacking the enemy.

REACTIONS
Elements may choose to reserve some of their actions as reactions. Reactions enable you to respond to enemies within 10cm of your elements, this distance is known as the ‘Zone of Control’. Therefore, if you have activated a unit and are perhaps 15-20cm away from the enemy it may be wise to reserve some of your actions as reactions so that you can repulse the enemy of they attack.

If you’re outside of the zone of control of an enemy and you’re moving a unit that will end all its actions without entering an enemies Zone of Control you can choose to use all your actions at once to speed up play. For example, moving your infantry 10cm instead of 2cm per action.

ZONE OF CONTROL
Once opposing elements close to within 10cm they have entered the zone of control. From this point forward these elements can only move directly towards or directly away from the enemy in their ZoC.

Actions within a ZoC must be taken one at a time and must be preceded by a morale check for the unit performing the action. If they fail their morale check then depending on how badly that unit has failed by will determine how the unit reacts.

If the element passes its morale check it may use an action as normal and the enemy must then make a morale test to perform a defensive reaction. If either element fails their morale test by a value of 2 or less, that element will withdraw directly away from the enemy at its standard move rate (while keeping its front towards the enemy), this is known as a withdrawal, it may not make any more actions that turn aside from defensive fire or withdrawals as reactions. If an element fails by a value of more than 2 then that element flees using the move distance it has available from its remaining actions (i.e., the element has four actions remaining, it will make four move actions ending with the element facing away from the enemy and the element may not use perform any other actions or reactions that turn and must pass a morale test the next turn to move as normal. If it fails this test then it will flee a further 5 actions.

ACTIONS & REACTIONS

Order (Cost: 1 Action Point)
A general can issue an order once per turn to a subcommander (this may be a General of Division in the case of the Commander-in-Chief or a Brigade in the case of the General of Division). When doing so, an ADC is placed in base-to-base contact with the command stand issuing the order, it may then move 30cm towards its intended target regardless of terrain.

March (Cost: 1 Action Point) Offensive/Defensive
The entire Brigade may make a move at the speed of its slowest Unit on the March. The defensive version moves the Brigade away from the enemy. Units cannot use Reactions to advance.

Quick March (Cost: 1 Action Point)
The entire Brigade may make a move at the slowest of its Unit on the Quick March. This cannot be used inside the Zone of Control of an enemy unit.

Change Unit Formations (Cost: 1 Action Point)
Any Units within the Brigade can change their formation is they are able to do so. Formations can either be Line, Square, Column or Skirmish.

Change Brigade Formation (Cost: 3 Action Points)
The entire Brigade can change its formation to having either 4, 3, 2 or 1 wide in units. Cannot be performed in a Zone of Control of the enemy.

Fire Skirmish Weapons (Cost: 1 Action Point)
A unit that has skirmish dice under its attributes can fire these at the enemy if it wishes. If it does so, the weapons can fire at long range as though they were inside effective range (hitting on 4+ instead of 6+ on their Fire! roll). This represents the skirmishers moving ahead of the main body of troops and firing on the enemy as they approach. The process for firing skirmish dice is the same as firing the weapons of the rest of the Brigade.

Fire! (Cost: 1 Action Point) offensive/defensive
The Brigade can fire all its available combat dice assigned to the front rank of units in the Brigade.

Bombard (Cost: 1 Action Point) offensive/defensive
The Brigade can fire all its available artillery dice assigned to the Brigade. If an enemy is within the Brigades Zone of Control that enemy must be the target.

Hold! (Cost: 0 Action Points) offensive/defensive
The Brigade holds position waiting for the enemy to move closer. If the enemy brigade is within weapon range the Brigade must pass a command test, if it fails to do so the Brigade will fire all its weapons at the closest enemy within range.

MOVEMENT
When using a march action foot troops can move 2cm per action, if using a quick march action, they can move 3cm.

Mounted troops move at a rate of 4cm on the march per action and 8cm at quick march.

ADVANCED RULES

Capturing Generals
Players whose Brigades move over or finish their move on top of an enemy general are considered to have captured that General. He must stay in base-to-base contact with that Brigade until a friendly Brigade defeats them in combat or the end of the game. An extra victory point is awarded per General captured or killed.

Capturing Enemy Colours
A Brigade can capture the colours of enemy units it defeats in melee on a roll of a 6. An extra victory point is awarded per colour captured.

Using Strength
If players wish and they agree between themselves, they can use the strength stat on the Brigades, this will need tracking throughout the game.  At the end of the game subtract your ending strength of all your units against what you began with. The difference between these two figures is the number of loss’s your army has suffered. Multiply the value by 50 to give you a rough estimate of how many men were killed or wounded during the engagement. This works best for replicating historical battles and comparing your results to that of the General who commanded the army at the time.

FIRING
Any type of firing is broken down into two steps.

1st Step: Steady!
Each Brigade is given a ‘Steady’ stat, this represents how nervous the men are in battle and how likely they’re to load and fire their weapons correctly. This is usually a roll of 5+.

2nd Step: Fire!
Successful ‘Steady!’ rolls then go on to make their ‘Fire!’ roll which at the effective range of the weapon is 4+ while long range is 6+. Any success from this count as hits on the enemy, if the enemy is allowed to make saving throws, they would do so once hits have been allocated to their Brigades.

TERRAIN TYPES

Woods Difficult Terrain, units inside woods receive a saving throw of 5+ from any type of weapons fire.

Ploughed FieldsRough Terrain

Villages/TownsDifficult Terrain, units inside villages or towns are considered to be imbedded inside the buildings etc and therefore receive a saving throw of 4+. Other units can attack units embedded in Villages or Towns in melee but the defender receives +1 to their combat dice.

CliffsImpassable Terrain

RavinesImpassable Terrain

LakesImpassable Terrain

RiversDifficult Terrain

Gentle HillsOpen Terrain, however units in melee in a lower position on the hill than their target suffer -1 to their combat dice rolls.

Steep HillsRough Terrain, units in melee in a lower position on the hill than their target suffer -2 to their combat dice rolls (rolls of 6 will always hit).

MarshDifficult Terrain

WEAPONS (these will be superseded by the Nations Army Lists once fully written)

Pistols
Effective Range: 1cm
Long Range: 2cm

Muskets
Effective Range: 2cm
Long Range: 4cm

Rifles
Effective Range: 4cm
Long Range: 8cm

6 Pounder Cannon
Effective Range: 10cm
Long Range: 15cm

12 Pounder Cannon
Effective Range: 12cm
Long Range: 20cm

Howitzers
Effective Range: 15cm
Long Range: 25cm

BASIC UNITS ARMY LIST (these will be superseded by the Nations Army Lists once fully written)

LINE INFANTRY           
Command: No effect
Type: Foot
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 200 men added
Skirmish Dice: +1 per 1000 men added
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules: None

LIGHT INFANTRY
Command: No effect
Type: Foot
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 200 men added
Skirmish Dice: +1 per 1000 men added
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Deployment Marker’ – adds a deployment marker for the player to use in the scouting phase of the game.

HEAVY CAVALRY
Command: No effect
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 50 men added
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Cavalry (-2)’ – All enemy foot units within 10cm suffer a -2 modifier on their morale test rolls.

LINE CAVALRY
Command: No effect
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 50 men added
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Cavalry (-1)’ – All enemy foot units within 10cm suffer a -1 modifier on their morale test rolls.

LIGHT CAVALRY
Command: +1 per unit added
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: +1 per 50 men added
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: No effect
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Cavalry (-1)’ – All enemy foot units within 10cm suffer a -1 modifier on their morale test rolls.
‘Deployment Marker’ – adds a deployment marker for the player to use in the scouting phase of the game.

FOOT ARTILLERY
Command: No effect
Type: Foot
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: No effect
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: +1 per weapon
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Artillery’ – In Melee this unit halves the number of combat dice it may use.

HORSE ARTILLERY
Command: No effect
Type: Mounted
Morale: +1 per unit added
Strength: +1 per 50 men added
Steady: No effect
Combat Dice: No effect
Skirmish Dice: No effect
Artillery Dice: +1 per weapon
CC v Foot: No effect
CC v Mounted: No effect
Additional Rules:
‘Artillery’ – In Melee this unit halves the number of combat dice it may use.

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Russian Infantry Units

“The Russians had to be beaten down man by man … our soldiers fired upon them at 25 paces, they continued their march without replying, every regiment filed past, without saying a word, or slackening its pace for a moment. The streets were filled with dying and wounded, but not a groan was heard … you might have said that they were firing at shadows. At last our soldiers charged the Russian soldiers with the bayonet, and only when they pierced them could they be convinced that they were dealing with men.”

Baron de Marbot – Battle of Golymin
General Raievski and the Russian Infantry in 1812

According to the French author Loraine Petre the stamina of Russian foot troops were incredible. The Russians were able to march for days at a time at night and still have the energy to fight in battle, all with very little rest or food.

The vast majority of Russian infantry were uneducated country people. Their illiteracy ratio was higher than that of any other European country at the time with only 1 private in 24 being able to read and write in the 1790’s. Even among the NCO’s 1 in 6 corporals and 4 in 14 sergeants were literate.

The Russians also had a reputation for drinking, with the troopers receiving 3/8 litre of ‘liquor’. Anything stronger than beer was often diluted. According to Bulgarin, in the Battle of Heilsberg (1807), Grand Duke Constantine brought two wagons of ‘Grain Wine’ and Suhary for his Uhlan regiment before they were to go into action.

“When they are on the offensive they are fortified by copious distributions of alcohol, and they attack with a courage which verges on a frenzy, and would rather get killed than fall back. The only way to make them desist is to kill a great number of their officers .. The Russian infantry withstand fire fearlessly, but their own fire is badly directed .. they are machines which are actuated only by the orders of their officers.”

Tedd Kosciuszko – Polish revolutionary leader

Each Russian regiment was made up of three battalions of four companies, Grenadier Regiments had one Grenadier battalions and two fusilier battalions. Musketier (Musketeer) regiments had one Grenadier battalion and two Musketeer battalions, while Jager regiments were composed of three Jager battalions.

Like my articles for the Austrian forces, I will run through each unit type and then summarise their unit attributes and any special rules at the end of their sections.

LINE INFANTRY

“The bullet’s an idiot, the bayonets a fine chap’

“Pulia duraka, no shtyk molodets” – Suvorovian Motto

The Russian weaponry was often a mix of different calibre muskets as well as muskets from foreign nations in addition to their own. Many muskets were so old and worn out from firing that they would no longer function.

There were thousands of captured weapons, and the Russians considered the French ‘Charleville’ musket as the lightest and best made, the British ‘Brown Bess’ was larger but more durable while the Prussian, Swedish and old Russian muskets were considered unwieldly.

Between 1803 and 1812 the Russian factories in Tula issued 20,000 rifles, but this was withdrawn in June 1808 and used only by NCO’s and 12 marksmen in a line infantry’s Jaeger company.

Unit Attributes

Russian Line Infantry

Special Rules

  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).

GUARD INFANTRY

The elite of the Russian infantry, which were comparable to the French Guard units. The officers of Guard infantry were from nobility and were treated as two ranks above their counterparts in the other infantry regiments, while NCO’s were treated as a rank higher.

The guard received the best uniforms, the best weapons and the best recruits. Tsar Paul revised the Guard and imposed discipline and accountability on its commanders. Tsar Paul also removed all officers not on active duty and the Guard were to learn the Prussian drill which at that time was considered to be the best in Europe. Tsar Paul was eventually murdered, some of those involved in his murder were Officers of the Guard…. His son Alexander took the Guard to battle at every opportunity which garnered them experience and soon made them some of the best troops in Europe. They became particularly well known for their endurance.

Unit Attributes

Russian Guard Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Brave – Each turn a unit with this ability may automatically pass one morale test.
  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).

JAGERS

The Russian troops were assigned regiments depending on their stature. The tallest would become Grenadiers, while the smallest would become Jagers. This changed later in the war when in 1811 Field Marshal Barclay de Tolly changed the system so that personal merit and worth determined a man’s assignment.

Jagers were the standard Russian light infantry unit, and while classified as light troops their skirmishing ability was almost non-existent. The majority were armed with Muskets, while a few 12 sharpshooters in each company were equipped with Rifles.

Unit Attributes

Russia Jager Unit Card

Special Rules

  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Jagers allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.

OPOLCHENIE

Raised in 1812 as part of the defence of Russia from Napoleon. These makeshift units were poorly armed and poorly trained. There were often not even enough muskets for each man, and instead pikes were issued where muskets were not.

Unit Attributes

Russian Opolchenie Unit Card

Special Rules

None

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SOURCES

http://napolun.com/mirror/napoleonistyka.atspace.com/Russian_guard.htm

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http://www.theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=212800

https://blundersonthedanube.blogspot.com/2012/02/russian-opolchenie-militia-1812.html

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Austrian Infantry Units

The army of the Holy Roman Empire/Austrian Empire was known as the Imperial-Royal Army, the “Royal” referring to the Kingdom of Hungary which was under Habsburg rule but not part of the Holy Roman Empire.

At its largest in 1809 it contained 261,000 infantry, 59,000 cavalry and 12,000 artillerymen, however due to a lack in funds the army in the field was often much smaller.

I’m going to run through each type of infantry unit in the Austrian army and then summarise there attributes and special rules at the end of their respective sections.

All of the unit cards given in this article are assuming a full strength unit of roughly 1,200 men. The Austrian units were often thought to be unwieldly, and therefore all infantry units have had the number of combat dice reduced by one.

LINE INFANTRY

Austrian Line Infantry

Austrian infantry were divided into two groups; ‘German’ and ‘Hungarian’. Hungarian regiments were known for their fierce fighting spirit, while the German regiments were known for their training and discipline.

In March 1809 there were 46 ‘German’ regiments and 15 ‘Hungarian’ regiments, Grenadiers of these regiments were detached to form their own battalions. In the case of all Austrian regiments, and not only the line infantry they were often referred to by their Colonels name and not their regiment number. For example the 1st Line Infantry Regiment was known as Infantry Regiment ‘Kaiser Franz I’ Nr. 1.

Austrian line regiments were armed with Muskets, and the third rank of the line regiments were able to be deployed as skirmishers in battle.

Unit Attributes

UnitTypeCombat Dice‘Steady’CC v FootCC v MountedBase MoraleSaveWeapons
‘German’ Line InfantryFoot55+5+6+7Muskets
‘Hungarian’ Line InfantryFoot55+5+6+6Muskets
Line Infantry Unit Attributes

Special Rules

  • Skirmishers Line infantry are able to deploy skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers.

LANDWEHR (1808-1809) (1813-1814)

“Only provinces in Germany were allowed to form landwehr battalions, as the territory of Galicia, heavily populated with Poles and sympathetic towards Napoleon, were forbidden to raise such formations.”

– John Stallaert (The Austrian Army)

Landwehr battalions were each roughly 1,200 men spread between 4-6 fusilier companies and 2 Jaeger companies. These Jaeger companies were armed with Jägerstutzen which were primarily used as hunting rifles and were accurate up to 300 paces. The rest of the battalion would often be armed with what ever muskets could be found. Often these would be 1754, 1774 or 1784 pattern muskets.

150 battalions of Landwehr were initially going to be raised, but by the point that war broke out with France in April 1809 only 70 had been raised.

When war broke out in 1809 the Landwehr battalions were used as garrison troops freeing up the regular infantry for field combat. Some battalions were used in the field – 12,200 Landwehr were deployed in upper Austria but when the French approached close to three quarters of these troops deserted.

Upon Napoleon’s victory he decommissioned the Landwehr battalions. They were reinstated when war broke out once more in 1813.

Unit Attributes

UnitTypeCombat Dice‘Steady’CC v FootCC v MountedBase MoraleSaveWeapons
LandwehrFoot55+5+6+5Muskets and Rifles
Landwehr Unit Attributes

Special Rules

  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).

GRENZERS

Austrian Grenzers

The Grenzers were light infantry troops originally raised to defend the border from the neighbouring Ottoman Empire. These troops were trained in skirmishing, marksmanship and the basics of linear tactics. Although the troops were effective Skirmishers, they were found lacking when it came to combat in line they were less effective than their line infantry counterparts. At the start of the conflict with Napoleon there were 18 Grenzer regiments raised which formed roughly a quarter of the army.

Although the Austrian command did not hold Grenzers in high regard, following the battles of Austerlitz and Marengo they had earned a level of respect from the French. Napoleon considered them the most effective troops in the Austrian army, so much so that once his victory over the Austrian Empire was confirmed he employed some of these troops in his own army, where they continued to serve until his abdication in 1814.

Unit Attributes

UnitTypeCombat Dice‘Steady’CC v FootCC v MountedBase MoraleSaveWeapons
GrenzerFoot55+5+6+7Muskets
Grenzer Unit Attributes

Special Rules

  • Deployment Marker – Units of Grenzers allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.
  • Skirmishers – Grenzers are able to fight as skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers.
  • Marksmen – Grenzers are able to re-roll one failed ‘Fire!’ dice per shooting attack.

GRENADIERS

Austrian Grenadiers

“The first Austrian grenadiers came into being in 1700, at the height of the European vogue for grenade-throwing heavyweight infantry. The fashion passed soon enough, for the grenades were cumbersome, tricky to ignite, and only marginally less perilous to the thrower than to the target. However the grenadiers themselves survived in virtue of being elite troops in their own right, and they were marked out by their stature, their swarthy complexions, their bristling moustaches, their arrogant demeanour, their grenadier marches (characterised by alternate passages on the rim and the skin of the drum), and their grenadier caps …”

Duffy – “Instrument of War” Vol I p 234

The Grenadiers were the elite soldiers of the Austrian army. The men that made up the Grenadiers were taller and more experienced than most (due to the joining requirements). The Grenadiers were primarily used at critical moments to break through the enemy lines and were kept in reserve until this moment. Austrian Grenadiers had a reputation for using their bayonets at every available opportunity.

In 1809, at the battle of Aspern-Essling the French Young Guard were ordered to recapture the village of Essling. The young Guard eventually pushed the Grenadiers from the village but paid a large price in doing so, with three of their Generals wounded and roughly a quarter of the rank and file killed or wounded. The Young Guard were so enraged by these losses that they killed or wounded Grenadiers left in the village.

There were twenty-one Grenadier battalions with four or six companies each.

Unit Attributes

UnitTypeCombat Dice‘Steady’CC v FootCC v MountedBase MoraleSaveWeapons
GrenadiersFoot55+4+6+7Muskets
Grenadier Unit Attributes

Special Rules

None

JAEGERS

Austrian Jaeger

“Austrian Generals don’t understand this kind of fighting [Skirmishing].”

General Radetsky

The Jaegers were the Austrian light infantry. The Austrian light infantry units would ofen only send out small amounts of men as skirmish screens in front of the main battalions. This usually consisted of between 60-80 men operating as a skirmish screen. It wasn’t until 1813 that entire battalions of light infantry would form skirmish lines.

The first and second ranks of the unit would be armed with muskets, while the third rank were armed with Rifles.

In 1809 there were nine Jaegar battalions which later increased to 12 in 1813. These battalions were often 6 companies of 200 men each. The quality of the Austrian skirmishers were not as effective as their French counterparts and they would often be found wanting when facing Voltigeurs.

Unit Attributes

UnitTypeCombat Dice‘Steady’CC v FootCC v MountedBase MoraleSaveWeapons
JaegersFoot55+5+6+6Muskets and Rifles
Grenadier Unit Attributes

Special Rules

  • Jaeger Company – One firing dice per firing action can be rolled using the ranges of Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).
  • Skirmishers – Jaegers are able to fight as skirmishing troops in front of the main battle line. When doing so they can only be attacked by cavalry or opposition skirmishers. Skirmishers of Jaegers are armed with Rifles (8cm Long/4cm Effective).
  • Deployment Marker – Units of Jaegers allows the owning player to use an additional deployment marker in the scouting phase.

FULL AUSTRIAN INFANTRY UNIT CARD

UnitTypeCombat Dice‘Steady’CC v FootCC v MountedBase MoraleSaveWeaponsSpecial Rules
‘German’ Line InfantryFoot55+5+6+7MusketsSkirmishers
‘Hungarian’ Line InfantryFoot55+5+6+6MusketsSkirmishers
LandwehrFoot55+5+6+5Muskets & RiflesJaeger Company
GrenzersFoot55+5+6+7MusketsDeployment Marker, Skirmishers, Marksmen
GrenadiersFoot55+4+6+7Muskets
JaegersFoot55+5+6+6Muskets & RiflesJaeger Company, Skirmishers, Deployment Marker
Austrian Infantry Unit Card
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SOURCES